Archives For November 2017

Hawks’ 2nd-year forward DeAndre Bembry isn’t used to watching his team play from the sidelines.

The 23-year-old wing out of Saint Joseph hadn’t dealt with an injury that has held him out as long as the fractured wrist he suffered in the Hawks’ season-opening win against the Dallas Mavericks back on Oct. 18.

This season, a season in which Bembry was expected to have a significant role increase for the Hawks, he’s been hit with two injuries that have kept him off the court. Bembry also sustained a strained right tricep in September that kept him out for about a month.

“I’ve never with injuries throughout my career, other than rolled ankles and stuff like that,” Bembry said. “It’s been funny, I got two injuries in a row with the arm muscle and then right after that I fractured my wrist, this is my first time and I’m just pushing through it.”

The initial prognosis called for Bembry to miss four-to-six weeks. Three weeks after his surgery Bembry is starting to see the light at the end of the tunnel for his return. Prior to Wednesday’s win over the Sacramento Kings Bembry was able to get up some shots pregame.

“I’m feeling a lot better,” Bembry said. “Going into three weeks off of surgery, the scale was between four-to-six weeks and I’m probably going to get another X-Ray to see how it’s looking this week just to check on it and see what’s inside and how its healed so far. That’s going to be the start of whenever I can come back. I’m working out, I’m shooting jumpers… The process has been going well so far.”

Bembry was indeed back soon, as he was listed as probably in the Hawks’ injury report on Friday. Bembry finally returned to game-action against the Celtics on Saturday, but was quickly put back on the bench when it because clear that thinks still weren’t 100-percent for him.

As Bembry said before, he doesn’t want to be hampered by the injury when he is on the floor.

“It’s full throttle when I get back, that’s why we’re having this process now, going through the motions of working out and seeing how much I can take as far as the pressure of pushing people and getting back out there,” Bembry said.

One Bembry is ready to fully return, Hawks’ head coach Mike Budenholzer’s bench gets deeper as the addition/return of Bembry adds another versatile wing that can play both ends of the floor as well as take some of the ball-handling duties and pressure off of the three point guards the Hawks rotate.
Bembry is ready to help where he can to give the Hawks a boost after a 3-13 start to the season.

“I’m definitely ready to get back out there, it’s tough when you’ve got a lot of guys that’s hurt and a lot of new guys coming in with big roles,” Bembry said. “I was looking forward to the start of the season, but I took the loss at the beginning and now I’m just trying to come back out there and try to help my teammates get a win somehow.”

For the second time in two weeks, the Hawks lose a heartbreaker to the hottest team in the NBA.

Atlanta walked into a Philips Arena filled with more green than a Wiz Kahlifa video. Fully aware of the the Celtics 14-game win streak that was at stake. They gave Boston their best shot but fell short 110-99.

“I knew at some point whether when they made the run or at the end of the game they would come back at some point,” said John Collins. “Talented and a well coached team you know will come back with something.”

Out the gate they jumped out on the Celtics to an impressive 26-10 lead. No suprise if you ask them, they believe they can run with the best of them. But, they also understand this Celtics team is as elite as there is in the league.

“Sure you believe, when you go up 15 points or however much we were up,” said Collins.  “It always creeps into your mind. But these guys aren’t going to lay down. They aren’t going to give up their streak.”

Impressively, Atlanta very rarely blinked whenever Boston made a run through the first three quarters.

The resilience was evident all night long. Celtics started the 2nd half with a couple buckets from Al Horford and Jaylen Brown to reduce the lead to just one, then Schroder responded with 8 points. Brown cashed in a 3 with 5:49 in the third quarter to give the Celtics a three point lead — Luke Babbitt responded with a three of his own. The ball movement was evident all night and created good looks.

“People can see we can compete with anybody,” said Malcolm Delaney. “When we pass we look like one of the best passing teams in the league. “

Passing is just a portion of the battle when you face a Brad Stevens’ team that has rallied from a significant deficit several times during this current streak. Atlanta on the other hand will need to address their late game struggles. Tonight was another reminder after they trailed by just one with 6:35 left in the 4th quarter that they will continue to lose games if they can’t find an answer.

“Some of the leads we have when we got back into the game after losing the lead we need to take those possessions more seriously,” said Delaney. “That’s how we will win a couple games. When you look deep into the stats, we are terrible at finishing games.”

They won’t have much time to harp on this loss with a trip on Monday to San Antonio, who have won six of their last eight.

 

 

It’s the little things.

Atlanta Hawks’ point guard Malcolm Delaney dives on the floor to tip a loose ball away from a Boston Celtics’ guard as Dennis Schroder sprints full speed after the loose ball. Schroder gathers the ball just before it goes out of bounds and finds center DeWayne Dedmon streaking down the middle of the paint for a dunk. Two points, all based on a few small, extra efforts.

The Hawks’ energy was evidenced throughout Monday’s game on a couple of occasions. Late in the fourth quarter, a Kent Bazemore pass was intercepted by Marcus Smart, Schroder did not pout or hesitate, it was a dead sprint back to get into position to where Schroder ultimately earned a charge. Next possession, Schroder hit a mid-range jumper to put the Hawks ahead by one.

Little things.

“For every team, it’s (hustle) is going to give energy into the game when somebody hustles or dives on the floor like Malcolm (Delaney) did, that’s why I chased the ball down,” Schroder said. “Those kinds of plays give the team energy. We competed for 48 minutes, we did a great job sticking with them, but they hit some tough shots, we’ve got to give them credit.”

Prior to the 2017-2018 NBA season the chatter league-wide stated that the Hawks weren’t supposed to be good. They were a lottery-bound team with slim hopes of many winning nights.

Well, they don’t seem to know nor care what they are ‘supposed’ to be. The Hawks knocked off the presumed top-dogs in the Eastern Conference Sunday evening in a 117-115 win over the Cleveland Cavaliers. Monday, they battled the team that was considered the next best thing in the Boston Celtics to a 110-107 loss. The Hawks had their chances and with a little over a minute left in the game the Hawks looked up and saw themselves in the lead.

Little things.

“We don’t have a superstar or whatever, so we’ve got to do all the little things like competing on the defensive end, dive on the floor whatever it takes to win some games,” Schroder said. “I think we got better tonight competing for 48 minutes and they hit some tough shots and you’ve got to give them credit.”

The Hawks’ loss Monday night dropped them to 2-9 on the season, a record that was expected but deceiving. The Hawks have been in most of their losses with only three coming by a margin of 12 or more. Bazemore feels that there is a light at the end of the tunnel that has been the first 11 games of the season and thinks the energy and effort of the last few games have brought the team closer together.

“Our record doesn’t show, but it’s not as bad as it looks,” Bazemore said. “We’ve been in pretty much every game. I thought the Houston game and probably the Milwaukee game out of the 11 we’ve played were the only two that we kind of didn’t show up. Going into the last three games actually brought us closer together. If you’d have told someone we’d split these games at this point of time in the season, they’d probably laugh. To get one of the two is big for us. We actually had chances to win two, so it’s early in the season and we still got 71 to go so anything can happen.”

This time last year Taurean Prince’s primary focus was adjusting to all the challenges the NBA has to offer along with satisfying his rookie duties. This year he is facing a new challenge — fatherhood.

Ameera Prince arrived five months ago, but surprisingly, an emotional player like Prince initially expressed very little feeling.

“It was so surprising really because I didn’t cry or anything. It was so indescribable. Something you really can’t describe unless you go through it. Seeing her is like that’s me right there. From that moment your entire mindset changes on how you do things and how you carry yourself. Five months have flown by just like that and I’m getting better every day. It’s amazing. Just getting to see her smile every morning she wakes up. Even the times she cries you get a chance to comfort her.”

 

Via Instagram: @taureanprince

The first child for any parent offers up challenges that you won’t be prepared for. Now add a demanding and travel-heavy NBA lifestyle on top of that, and you are in for a ton of work. It doesn’t matter if you are one of the best players in league with commitments from endorsers pulling you left and right or the 12th man at the end of the bench.  Fatherhood never stops.

The physical demands Prince faces day in and day out means less time spent with Ameera. So he’s appreciative of the work and love his long time girlfriend shows their daughter.  

“I have an amazing girlfriend. She does so much being that I’m tired a lot of the times. Credit to her. She wakes up in the middle of the night and takes care of my daughter. I try to do the little things like make bottles and feed her. But my girlfriend is a great mother.”

Via Instagram: @Taureanprince

Prince may not know it all when it comes to fatherhood, but he does understand what showing support truly means when it comes to raising a child. Before he left to play his college ball at  Baylor, he helped his mother raise his baby brother for two years following the death of the baby’s biological father. Prince’s mother needed someone to help watch the baby while she was at work, Taurean was there. Feeding and changing diapers, Taurean didn’t mind.

Fast forward six years later and the same devotion is reciprocating from his family.

“It’s great. My father lives in Atlanta, so he’s ten, fifteen minutes down the road. Anytime my girlfriend needs something he watches her weekends at a time so that sometimes me and her can get alone time and go kick it. When my mother is in town, she watches her. Everybody loves her and those who are first-time parents always need that support. Its different for the second or third time around. But the first one we are grateful for the people that show love to her.”

A big part of playing this game is not only for love, but to financially secure your family for years to come. Just last month the Hawks picked up his third-year option to lock him in for another season.That security allows Prince to create a quality lifestyle for Ameera to grow and blossom within.

However, a quality lifestyle does not negate the obstacles she will face as a woman once she embarks on the world. Prince is fully aware and believes that a sound parenting foundation is critical, but her own experiences will mean just as much.

“You can’t control a lot of the things that we are scared about. All we can do as parents is do what we can do for them the first 18 years of their lives and lead them in the right direction. Lead them towards greatness and success. Lead them to do things that we didn’t do in order to be successful. That is my only goal. When she’s grown, she’s grown just like when my parents released me into the world. They allowed me to make my mistakes and that allowed me to become the man I am because of the mistakes I’ve made. They advised me to do better and that’s all you can do for your daughter. All you can do is prepare them for what you know or what you think they will face and leave the rest up to them.”

The same importance applied to the work Prince puts into perfecting his craft on the court is equally exerted towards his conduct and being a better person. He’s continuously paying attention to how he treats anybody he interacts with. The goal now is leaving a lasting legacy that Ameera will not only be proud of but adopt as a way of life.

“My main thing I want to leave behind is how I treat people. I hold myself accountable for shaking hands every time I’m done working out, whether it be the coaches or the people who rebound for me. Respecting all things until somebody gives me a reason not to. Yes sir, no sir, no mam, yes mam and just doing right by people whether they’re the janitor, GM or the owner in any establishment. I just want to shed that to her and do right by people. God will take care of the rest.”

No longer is he Taurean Prince the NBA player. The correct phrasing would now be: Ameera’s father, who plays basketball for a living.