Archives For Atlanta Hawks

Just a week ago new GM Travis Schlenk stated his draft philosophy is taking the most talented player available rather than addressing a positional need. But a lot has changed now with Dwight Howard’s departure and free agent Paul Millsap’s possible exit hanging in the balance —  the Hawks decided it would be in their best interest to select Wake Forest’s John Collins Thursday night. A pleasant surprise for the Hawks front office as they were not able to host Collins for a work out due to his lottery projections.

“We thought he would go a little bit higher for sure,” said Schlenk. “The whole process with the agents sending guys where they think is the best slot for their guys to go in the short period of time they have. His agent sent him to places higher than us. But, he’s a kid we scouted a lot during the pro-day out in LA. I saw him play three times this year, probably four or five times last year. We are comfortable with him.”

Atlanta saw Collins’ multifaceted approach of impacting the game and felt he would add value to a frontline they are presently restructuring. Despite finishing a solid ninth as a team in rebounding this past season, that wasn’t the case in Budenholzer’s first three seasons; they finished no better than 24th, with rebounding often being pointed out as the team’s biggest weakness.

With Howard gone, Collins may be able to help the Hawks from falling back down so quickly. On average, Collins snagged down nearly 10 rebounds a game last year for Wake Forest. Collins could be able to contribute on offense as well, as he averaged 19 points per game last season, mostly due to his knack for finishing around the basket. Despite having Dwight Howard and Paul Millsap, Atlanta finished just 19th in points in the paint during the 2016-17 season.

“First off, his athleticism and ability to run the floor,” said Schlenk. “He’s a great rebounder, which obviously we know we’ve struggled a little bit in the past here. He can also score in the post, so that gives us another option inside.”

“I think its great,” said Collins on his style of play in Coach Budenholzer’s system. “My ability to be as versatile as possible, but just as a flat liner, I think my game can fit with any coaching style. I think the way I play the game is flexible enough to mesh with any coaching style. Me and coach will obviously have to talk about what my role will be coming in as a young guy. I am definitely confident in our ability to build a relationship on and off the court.”

Collins, just 19, brings an abundance of talents to Atlanta and a ton of potential — to reach that ceiling he will need to expand his range.

“The first thing we are going to work on him with is his jump shot,” said, Schlenk. “As you guys watched him in college all his scoring came in the post. He’s got a good post game, we just need to extend his range out especially the way we play and the way the league is going.”

Stretching his game coincides with an Atlanta team looking to space the floor in order to create more room for Dennis Schroder to operate. Taurean Prince and DeAndre Bembry were drafted last year with the intent on reinvigorating more athletic playmakers along the wing. Collins’ selection continues that theme, but he understands what he first needs to improve on offensively and overall to help this team.

“I’m definitely looking to expand outwards away from the basket,” said Collins. “I think I have proven to a lot of people that I’m a proven scorer in and around the basket. But I want to be able to be as versatile as possible, shooting 3s, guarding multiple positions, make plays.”

Collins repeated what appears to be a growing theme under Coach Budenholzer.

“Be as versatile as possible.”

Collins continues not just the recent theme for Atlanta’s needs on the court, but also adds on to a list of former Demon Deacons that have worn a Hawks jersey. Jeff Teague was drafted by the Hawks in 2009 and his former coach Danny Manning averaged 15 points and six rebounds for a Lenny Wilkens’ coached squad in the 1993-94 season. However, the most recognizable Deacon outside of Tim Duncan has taken on a mentor role for Collins.

“CP [Chris Paul] has helped me out a lot along the way,” Collins said. “I had the opportunity to train with him in Los Angeles. He’s helped me and guided me every step of the way. He tells me to grip everything, know what’s in front of you, know what’s going on with your career because it’s your career. You got to have fun, that’s the biggest thing. You see a lot of guys get caught up in the lifestyle, trying to have fun, but obviously, try and continue to improve on your game.”

The Hawks are amidst a roster change with big decisions on the horizon. Collins’s selection might have come as a shock given the pre-Draft prognosis, but nevertheless a step in the right direction.

 Friday morning the Atlanta Hawks formally introduced Travis Schlenk as both their general manager and head of basketball operations. Schlenk, the 41-year old from Selden, Kansas is the 17th general manager in Hawks history and arrives after playing a key role as assistant general manager over the last five years in shaping what is now the most dominant team in the NBA — the Golden State Warriors.
 “Where Golden State is right now taking seven years, said Schlenk. “It is not a quick process and it takes time. The way you get there is by maintaining your flexibility, accumulating assets and developing your own talent. We have, in Coach Bud and his staff, a great group of coaches who’ve have done a great job historically of developing talents. So we are in great shape there. We have 11 draft picks coming up in the future, so we have flexibility and assets there. We are actually in a better place right now than Golden State was when I started there.”

With just eight players under contract set to return next season, there is either optimism or pessimism permeating down Peachtree Street and all throughout Atlanta. The decision to keep Paul Millsap during this past season sparked déjà vu for some after the front office tandem of Mike Budenholzer and GM Wes Wilcox elected to take a gamble and hold on to Al Horford after the trade deadline last year. Ultimately it cost Atlanta as they lost him to eastern conference rivals the Boston Celtics.

Fast-forward to now and Atlanta has yet again another big offseason decision to make. Their top scoring leader over the past three seasons and one of the most versatile forwards the league has to offer is set for free agency.

“Paul is a 4-time All-star and arguably the best player on this team, probably is the best player on this team, so that is going to be a priority, said Schlenk. For me right now I’ve got to get with Coach Budenholzer and his staff and my front office staff. Over the next three weeks, we have to hammer out a plan for the future. Paul is certainly going to be a priority.”

 

Millsap arrived in Atlanta along with Mike Budenholzer four years ago. The pair has successfully made the playoffs each season. During this time frame, they notched a #1 Eastern Conference seed in 2015 as well as a top-six defensive rating over the last three seasons. All this, and yet sustained success without a trophy to show for it doesn’t mean anything in the end.

Schlenk on the other hand values the consistency the organization has maintained over the years and space they now have to make possibilities a reality.

“For 10 years in a row, this franchise has been in the playoffs. Most of the time when guys take a job at my level their inheriting a bad team. I am inheriting a good team with a nice foundation that has some flexibility and that’s what we will look to maintain. As we get to a position where a trade or acquisition comes available for a superstar we will be in position to do that.”


“Superstar” — the response hastily and repeatedly heard with regards to what it will take for the Hawks to finally sip champagne. It is a rhetorical question to ask in all honesty. Aside from Dennis Schroder, and the developing Taurean Prince there aren’t many hybrid roster assets. Moreover, Atlanta’s draft choices have not panned out over the years — and without the ability to attract big free agents the team struggles to become a legitimate threat to the King from Akron.

In order for a drastic shift in expectations and trajectory, Atlanta will have to become much more aggressive making moves to acquire big talent. They have done well-shedding contracts over the past two seasons despite signing the hometown kid Dwight Howard to a three-year $70 million deal last summer. They currently have just $62,399,872 in team payrolls on their books — fifth lowest in the league.

Schlenk enters into an organization that has stayed clear of paying the NBA’s tax luxury since the 2002–2003 season — Jason Terry was just a third-year player. Yes, different ownership at the time, but nothing has changed in their efforts when it comes to watching the bottom line. Maybe it has cost them championships, maybe it hasn’t — even though the 2004 Pistons did win a title with just the 17th highest payroll — times have changed and biting the bullet may not seem so bad as the Cleveland Cavaliers did for their 2016 championship that cost them $54 million in luxury taxes.

Championships cost money.

“I don’t think it makes sense for a franchise to go into the tax unless you are competing for a championship, said Schlenk. “Being fiscally responsible with these gentleman’s money that’s not right. But if we are where we make a move its going to put us in tax by a few million dollars, but give us a better chance to win a championship. That’s when I will go to bat and knock on Tony’s door and say this is something we need to do because it will get us to where we want to go.”

A successful style of basketball arrived in Atlanta along with Mike Budenhozer in 2013. However, taking on the president of basketball operations position after Danny Ferry’s departure in 2015 appeared to be one job too many for Budenholzer. The team has taken a step back the last two seasons (eliminated in the semi-finals in 2016 and the first round this season) and ownership ultimately felt an individual with Schlenk’s team building knowledge and vigor was needed.

“We have tried to win every year, said Owner Tony Ressler. “There is no doubt that over the past two years what we’ve seen, and what I’ve said, is the goal is how do we make better decisions and how do we have more firepower in the front office. With a comfort level that we can get to the next level. We feel that Travis absolutely has that understanding and has seen it firsthand. As we learned in our reference checks, Travis understands every part and does the work. Understanding players, recruiting players and understanding what makes a franchise player-friendly. All of these are critically important for us.”

Friday marked the beginning of a new era in Atlanta Hawks basketball with hopes Schlenk can provide an innovative process towards becoming a powerhouse for a organization that has not reached an NBA Finals since 1961. Not only a powerhouse, but an attractive destination for years to come in a city desperately waiting for prosperity. Not an easy task, but he’s seen this before and played a pivotal role in the turnaround.

What a year it was covering this year’s Atlanta Hawks team. The acquisition of Dwight Howard jump started the summer with a jolt of excitement. The Southwest Atlanta Christian Academy alum came aboard with hopes to bring a championship to his hometown.

Instead, he ended the season sitting on the bench as his teammates clawed back from a 19 point deficit, only to come up short in game 6 versus the Wizards. That wasn’t the first time this season he sat during a crucial run, and the first year of the Howard experiment can be deemed a failure.

“ It doesn’t matter about matchups, said Howard in his exit interview. “ I want to play. I don’t care who is out there. I want to give the best for my team and the city. That is why I came here. So it is upsetting when you want to get out there and play. You work hard for something and you watch it being taken from you, not the coach taking it — but Washington taking the opportunity of us moving to the next round.”

First-year starter Dennis Schroder took advantage of his opening round matchup against All-NBA point guard John Wall — as he did against several elite point guards throughout the year — validating that the organization made the right decision when they handed him the keys over Jeff Teague. Paul Millsap’s free agency talk dominated and overshadowed much of his big-time all-star performances, as if his game needed further neglect on the national stage. However, to the credit of head coach and team president Mike Budenholzer, it never seemed to become a distraction.

Whether it was Millsap’s free agency, Schroder and Howard’s argument in the third quarter versus the Warriors during a live possession or Schroder’s late arrival from All-Star break due visa issues — the team remained positive and focused.

In the last four seasons under Budenholzer none of his teams were more inconsistent, erratic and perplexing than this 2016–2017 ballclub. The hot 9–2 start occurred so early it now qualifies as a mirage. By the end of December they were a more realistic 16–16. At that time they had a win over the Cleveland Cavaliers (and would later win the season series 3–1), but suffered losses against the Orlando Magic, Los Angeles Lakers and Phoenix Suns.

The month of January was very telling in terms of just how unsettled they were. Starting on the 13th until March 6th they never notched a winning streak more than two games. Win one, lose the next, win another, lose the next, identity crises at its finest.

Kent Bazemore expressed the same sentiment to me after asking him about the team’s issues following a 131–120 loss in December to the Orlando Magic that dropped their record to 12–13.

“This is a very deep team and we have a lot of guys who can play so it’s all about finding that rhythm as a unit”, Bazemore said. “We’ve had glimpses of both units doing well. The bench started off the season doing well, then the starters got going, so it’s a lot going on and not enough consistency. But we are not going to get it back all at once and we are still trying to figure out who we are.”

The lows were pretty damn low and can be summed up in a moment I personally witnessed covering the Brooklyn Nets routing on March 26th that handed the Hawks their seventh loss in a row. A fan casually strolled down from his seat into the credentialed media seating, nachos and soda in hand, and took a seat with the rest of us. Clearly he’d come to the conclusion at that time that the Hawks didn’t care, so why should he? Security never approached the gentleman or redirected him back to his original seating. He just sat there, apathetic, disinterested, scarfing down some nachos.

Their identity never seemed to take shape and why a large portion of the season Budenholzer experimented with several lineups during games looking for a spark on a team ranked in the bottom half of the league in scoring. Millsap spent plenty time at the five, Bazemore took over point guard duties at times and even Kyle Korver played power forward occasionally. Compound that with a defense that poorly defended the three-point line in today’s NBA and well you’ve put yourself in a tough spot.

Those spots ranged from out of playoff contention momentarily midway through the season to losing 9 out of 11 games (with Millsap and Bazemore missing games due to injury) down the stretch that put their playoff hopes in jeopardy and having to wait until the 79th game to breath a sigh of relief.

Schroder struggled limiting turnovers, Howard hurt the defense by staying in the paint during pick-and-roll situations and Bazemore’s $70 million contract seemed to cause him to press. The list goes on and on, but nuzzled in it all were some of the most thrilling moments in Hawks history. The 26 point deficient at the start of the fourth quarter comeback victory versus Cleveland on April 9th, the overtime upset over the San Antonio Spurs and of course who can forget what took place on January 29th — the quadruple overtime victory over the New York Knicks — just the 11th time in NBA history.

The game lasted four hours as people stood by the exit doors with one foot in the arena one foot out not able to tear themselves away from what was taken place.

Rookie Taurean Prince and pending restricted free agent Tim Hardaway Jr. also provided optimism and excitement throughout a treacherous seven months. Prince took advantage of Bazemore and Sefolosha’s injuries by showcasing his versatility and therefore cementing his spot in the starting lineup. Hardaway deserved Most Improved Player consideration after turning his 2015–2016 woes into a distant memory by becoming the team’s scoring spark they severely needed especially after Kyle Korver was dealt.

In the end this team surpassed many preseason predictions that slotted them for a low seeding at best. Another franchise-alternating free agency awaits them in the coming months, but as far as 2016–2017 went they were willing to fight no matter how steep the odds — despite being ill-equipped with the necessary firepower.

“This group was a fighting group,” said Paul Millsap after game 6 loss. “With the ups and downs we had, we found a way to fight and compete. We shut down a lot of naysayers. We had a lot of people that said we weren’t going to make the playoffs. We just ran into a team that was hot, the Wizards were hot. I like this team and the fight in this team.”

Game 5 Recap

Eric Yeboah —  April 27, 2017

What didn’t go well for the Atlanta Hawks

Atlanta never could establish a solid inside presence as Dwight Howard dealt with foul trouble most of the night. In the first quarter, Howard was exceptional at contesting and altering shots. Once the fouls started to add up, the Wizards saw a chance to attack the basket ending the night with 40 points in the paint as opposed to the Hawk’s 32. In a close contest every possession counts and Howard’s presence in the 4th was needed as the Wizards began attacking Mike Muscala and Paul Millsap relentlessly.

One of Washington’s run in that final quarter gave them a nine point advantage with 8:37 remaining might of been a signal for Howard to be inserted, but Budenholzer opted for a more pro-offense mindset with spacing down the stretch.

“Every game is a little different, said Budenholzer. “ Offensively we were kind of struggling to score, so maybe spread them out , get Paul [Millsap]into some space, let him attack and try to get him to the free throw line. But no doubt Dwight can have an impact on the boards and on what Gortat does or doesn’t do. Those are always the tough decisions that you have to make.”

What went well for the Hawks?

Pace means so much to a team like Atlanta that prides themselves on the amount of assists they accumulate as a team every game. The ball moved with a great deal of purpose behind it and consistently found easy targets for high percentage shots. Even when the Wizards started the 2nd half on a 19–9 run, the Hawks remained disciplined in their principles as opposed to moments in Games 1 & 2 when they fell into individual battles.

Tim Hardaway Jr. played a huge role in that success as he provided Dennis plenty of spacing scoring 10 crucial points, including back-to-back threes, in the third quarter to keep the team afloat.

We’ve seen it plenty of times in this league when players begin to play hero ball in hopes of a quick turnaround. Not tonight: this team constantly responded to every Washington run by staying aggressive but never out of control.

“ Stick with what we do, said Schroder. Move the ball after rebound and push the pace. I think Tim Hardaway did a great job. We just had to kick ahead pass and he shot it. We need him to make plays like that. Pull up for three and I think he made two in a row. I keep telling him in the game that he has to keep doing it. We need him to do the same on Friday.”

Suggested change for next game in series for the Hawks?

Washington may elect to double Paul Millsap on the block as they did in Wednesday’s game in hopes of keeping Morris out of foul trouble. It will be very important for the wings to find soft pockets within the defense. In Game 5, Taurean Prince was able to find some openings along the baseline and the same should be reiterated to others like Hardaway jr and Kent Bazemore for a pivotal Game 6. Outside of that, if the ball moves well enough then Washington cannot clamp down on Millsap and would have to play honest.

Prediction for next game:

Atlanta wins a close one back at Phillips Arena in front of crowd that has kept them in this series. Dwight and Markieff will both avoid foul trouble early on, allowing for a much more free-flowing pace for the first three quarters. Atlanta pulls away late in the fourth quarter as the refs will tighten their whistles favoring a tempo more friendly to their style of play and keeping Wall out of transition.

Game 4 Recap

Eric Yeboah —  April 25, 2017

What didn’t go well

For the second game in a row, Atlanta beat Washington in several categories, which may leave little to nit pick. However, Dennis Schroder and Jose Calderón did fall into foul trouble with three apiece before the first half ended. John Wall and Brandon Jennings attacked and had their aggressiveness used against them the same way Paul Millsap has done with Markieff Morris over the last three games. Budenholzer opted to stick with Calderon rather than going to Malcolm Delaney, but the amount of ball pressure they are instructed to heap on the Wizard’s backcourt is necessary yet dangerous. However, tonight Jose’s impact was far greater than normal.

“Jose most nights will probably not play enough minutes to foul out,” said Coach Budenholzer. “With Dennis with three fouls it may have been a little risky, but I just thought the way he and the team were playing I wanted to roll with that group.”

What went well

Dwight Howard made his proverbial entrance into this series in the 2nd quarter, scoring 10 of his 16 points. The first three games, the Wizards were exceptional at denying any lob opportunities, and Budenholzer was forced to limit Howard’s minutes in search of more shooting in small ball lineups. But the offense moved the ball well in game 4, shifting the Wizards’ defense off of Howard and allowing him to run much more freely to the basket without bodies draped all over him. Kent Bazemore connected with Howard for a couple highlight reel lob sequences that ignited the team and encompassed the do it all game his box score showed.

“I’ve continued to work, watch film and pick my spots,” Kent Bazemore said. “The pace was amazing tonight, the ball was moving and when you get touches your comfort level goes up a little bit. When you got guys on your team that really believe in you everyday is a new day. This is just another product of believing and staying the course.”

The team answered Coach Budenholzer’s transition defense demands to limit John Wall and his ability to find trailing shooters by allowing just 12 points, as opposed to the 21 points the Wizards averaged throughout the first three games. They struggled with controlling the pace and turnovers in the first two games, but on Monday they cleaned up both areas giving them a shot to slow Washington’s fast-break opportunities.

Suggested change for next game in series for the Hawks

The Wizards will be looking to force the Hawks backcourt into committing turnovers, as they did so successfully in games 1 and 2. There will need to be a continued emphasis on setting solid screens and moving the ball with a certain level of speed to counteract the Wizards length. Budenholzer should also stick to keeping at least one ball-handler on the floor at all times to help keep the turnover totals to a minimum, as they accomplished in games 3 and 4.

From a 9–2 start to out of playoff contention, from a streaking team to now stumbling into the postseason, the Hawks have seemingly endured it all this season. Sunday afternoon’s loss to the lowly Brooklyn Nets completed their second seven-game losing streak of the season. Thabo Sefolosha was a late game scratch and, with the Hawks already without Kent Bazemore, Tauren Prince was tapped for his first career start. And, if you’ve noticed the flashes that he’s shown throughout the year, the start went exactly as expected.

 

“He did what he normally does,” DeAndre Bembry said. “He was aggressive offensively, got a few steals, created fast-breaks and of course the good defense. That’s what Coach likes about us as rookies — we play on both sides of the ball.”

 

Tim Hardaway Jr. has been the surprise spark for the Hawks this, but Taurean is giving him a run for his money. Taurean has accomplished what very few rookies under Head Coach Mike Budenholzer have ever done — gain his undeniable trust. At the wing, where the Hawks have a logjam of veterans, Prince has emerged post-all star break shooting 40 percent from three while showcasing his ability to guard all positions except centers all while also playing with a spirit this team desperately needed.

 

“I’ve just come into the second half of the season with a different mindset of how I approach things, how I approach practice and different preparation,” Prince said. “It’s helped me out this far and I think it’s helped the team out as well and I plan to keep doing what I’m doing, but turn it up a little more. Especially since it’s coming to the end of the season.”

 

Currently, he sits as the team’s fifth-best defensive player according to defensive Box Plus/Minus. Especially given the troubles that Dwight Howard has faced in this particular defensive scheme during pick and roll situations and given Bazemore’s increased role as a ball handler throughout this season, there was an opportunity for Prince to earn his keep.

 

He’s done so in so many ways, displaying his ability to chase-down blocks, rotate over from the weak side, contest shots at the rim, anticipate steals and utilize his length in passing lanes. Prince has brought another dimension to this Hawks team that they desperately needed.

 

The bravado that Prince carries onto the floor isn’t always prevalent within many rookies, but it’s something Bazemore noticed earlier in the season. He spoke about it with me in November following Prince’s 19 minutes outing in a 107–100 win over the Milwaukee Bucks.

 

“Just another testament to the Atlanta Hawks player development system,” Bazemore said. “A guy works hard every day and when he gets his name called he’s ready. That’s one of his [Taurean’s] greatest attributes — he’s fearless, he’s out there chirping, hitting people, finishing above the rim and that’s his game. It’s good when you can get a young fella this early in his career and be that confident.”

 

The confidence was always there, but every rookie needs that breakout game or two to reassure themselves they belong. Just a few weeks ago, following a 16 point performance — his career high is 17 — against the Memphis Grizzlies, he acknowledged that that moment had arrived. In addition, his five points, five rebounds, three steals game against Portland on February 13th and again his eight points, 12 rebounds and two steals in Boston on February 27th  were a testament to his work ethic and another indication that he belonged, according to Prince.

 

“I’m a firm believer in if you put in the work then everything will take care of itself,” Prince said. “This summer Deandre and I were here, so credit to him and the coaching staff for putting us in the best position. Just being in the gym — especially at the beginning of the season when I wasn’t playing much — I was in the gym a lot more just trying to get reps. I just always had that confidence because I put in the work and believe in myself.”

 

Who would have guessed that? As a young player, especially a first round pick, the images of walking in and being a bonafide stud play through your head on several occasions. However, understanding the importance of how to be the best at what your role is on the team takes some time. Once that hill is climbed and embraced there is more room for growth, and Prince has acknowledged that truth.

 

Now, with the regular season coming to a close, Prince has caught on at the right time. The core players are fully aware of his value to this team and believe he will be a difference maker when they need it the most.

 

“It means a lot when you have guys like Paul Millsap, Dennis [Schroder] and Dwight [Howard] have that type of confidence in me and it’s another reason why I continue to play with confidence,” Prince said. “For me, it starts on the defensive end. I feel like in the beginning of the season I had a different mindset, but I’ve learned to focus on what’s more important. I just want to continue to get better and that’s the great thing about it is I have a lot of room to improve.”

 

There are some good news and some bad news about the Atlanta Hawks…

The good news is that the Atlanta Hawks won a game.

The bad news is that the Atlanta Hawks really should have lost.

The Atlanta Hawks are in a major freefall losing seven straight games which included an complete embarrassment loss to the Brooklyn Nets. They were still in the same set of circumstances injury wise, playing without the services of Paul Millsap, Kent Bazemore and Thabo Sefolosha. One more loss and the Hawks would match their longest losing streak in the Mike Budenholzer era which happened during his first season in 2014.

Dennis Schroder finished with 27 points, nine assists and six rebounds. He was key in a 17-1 run in the fourth quarter, hitting two consecutive 3-pointers to lift the Hawks to a 95-91 victory over the Phoenix Suns. That’s the good news…

Continue Reading…