Game 5 Recap

Eric Yeboah —  April 27, 2017

What didn’t go well for the Atlanta Hawks

Atlanta never could establish a solid inside presence as Dwight Howard dealt with foul trouble most of the night. In the first quarter, Howard was exceptional at contesting and altering shots. Once the fouls started to add up, the Wizards saw a chance to attack the basket ending the night with 40 points in the paint as opposed to the Hawk’s 32. In a close contest every possession counts and Howard’s presence in the 4th was needed as the Wizards began attacking Mike Muscala and Paul Millsap relentlessly.

One of Washington’s run in that final quarter gave them a nine point advantage with 8:37 remaining might of been a signal for Howard to be inserted, but Budenholzer opted for a more pro-offense mindset with spacing down the stretch.

“Every game is a little different, said Budenholzer. “ Offensively we were kind of struggling to score, so maybe spread them out , get Paul [Millsap]into some space, let him attack and try to get him to the free throw line. But no doubt Dwight can have an impact on the boards and on what Gortat does or doesn’t do. Those are always the tough decisions that you have to make.”

What went well for the Hawks?

Pace means so much to a team like Atlanta that prides themselves on the amount of assists they accumulate as a team every game. The ball moved with a great deal of purpose behind it and consistently found easy targets for high percentage shots. Even when the Wizards started the 2nd half on a 19–9 run, the Hawks remained disciplined in their principles as opposed to moments in Games 1 & 2 when they fell into individual battles.

Tim Hardaway Jr. played a huge role in that success as he provided Dennis plenty of spacing scoring 10 crucial points, including back-to-back threes, in the third quarter to keep the team afloat.

We’ve seen it plenty of times in this league when players begin to play hero ball in hopes of a quick turnaround. Not tonight: this team constantly responded to every Washington run by staying aggressive but never out of control.

“ Stick with what we do, said Schroder. Move the ball after rebound and push the pace. I think Tim Hardaway did a great job. We just had to kick ahead pass and he shot it. We need him to make plays like that. Pull up for three and I think he made two in a row. I keep telling him in the game that he has to keep doing it. We need him to do the same on Friday.”

Suggested change for next game in series for the Hawks?

Washington may elect to double Paul Millsap on the block as they did in Wednesday’s game in hopes of keeping Morris out of foul trouble. It will be very important for the wings to find soft pockets within the defense. In Game 5, Taurean Prince was able to find some openings along the baseline and the same should be reiterated to others like Hardaway jr and Kent Bazemore for a pivotal Game 6. Outside of that, if the ball moves well enough then Washington cannot clamp down on Millsap and would have to play honest.

Prediction for next game:

Atlanta wins a close one back at Phillips Arena in front of crowd that has kept them in this series. Dwight and Markieff will both avoid foul trouble early on, allowing for a much more free-flowing pace for the first three quarters. Atlanta pulls away late in the fourth quarter as the refs will tighten their whistles favoring a tempo more friendly to their style of play and keeping Wall out of transition.

Hello there!

Game 4 of the Hawks’ first round series against the Wizards is in the books and the series is now tied at 2-2 heading back to D.C. for Game 5.

This episode recaps the things the Hawks did to win Game 4 and how they can win Game 5 on Wednesday.

If you enjoyed the episode, a ReTweet is always appreciated.

Enjoy Game 5!

Game 4 Recap

Eric Yeboah —  April 25, 2017

What didn’t go well

For the second game in a row, Atlanta beat Washington in several categories, which may leave little to nit pick. However, Dennis Schroder and Jose Calderón did fall into foul trouble with three apiece before the first half ended. John Wall and Brandon Jennings attacked and had their aggressiveness used against them the same way Paul Millsap has done with Markieff Morris over the last three games. Budenholzer opted to stick with Calderon rather than going to Malcolm Delaney, but the amount of ball pressure they are instructed to heap on the Wizard’s backcourt is necessary yet dangerous. However, tonight Jose’s impact was far greater than normal.

“Jose most nights will probably not play enough minutes to foul out,” said Coach Budenholzer. “With Dennis with three fouls it may have been a little risky, but I just thought the way he and the team were playing I wanted to roll with that group.”

What went well

Dwight Howard made his proverbial entrance into this series in the 2nd quarter, scoring 10 of his 16 points. The first three games, the Wizards were exceptional at denying any lob opportunities, and Budenholzer was forced to limit Howard’s minutes in search of more shooting in small ball lineups. But the offense moved the ball well in game 4, shifting the Wizards’ defense off of Howard and allowing him to run much more freely to the basket without bodies draped all over him. Kent Bazemore connected with Howard for a couple highlight reel lob sequences that ignited the team and encompassed the do it all game his box score showed.

“I’ve continued to work, watch film and pick my spots,” Kent Bazemore said. “The pace was amazing tonight, the ball was moving and when you get touches your comfort level goes up a little bit. When you got guys on your team that really believe in you everyday is a new day. This is just another product of believing and staying the course.”

The team answered Coach Budenholzer’s transition defense demands to limit John Wall and his ability to find trailing shooters by allowing just 12 points, as opposed to the 21 points the Wizards averaged throughout the first three games. They struggled with controlling the pace and turnovers in the first two games, but on Monday they cleaned up both areas giving them a shot to slow Washington’s fast-break opportunities.

Suggested change for next game in series for the Hawks

The Wizards will be looking to force the Hawks backcourt into committing turnovers, as they did so successfully in games 1 and 2. There will need to be a continued emphasis on setting solid screens and moving the ball with a certain level of speed to counteract the Wizards length. Budenholzer should also stick to keeping at least one ball-handler on the floor at all times to help keep the turnover totals to a minimum, as they accomplished in games 3 and 4.

The Atlanta Hawks won wire-to-wire against the Washington Wizards in Game 3 of their best-of-7 series 116-98, trimming the series deficit to 1-2. John Wall led the Wizards with 29 points on 10-of-12 shooting while Brandon Jennings added 13 points.

For the Hawks, they were led by Paul Millsap’s 29 points and Dennis Schröder’s 27 points.

First quarter blitz brings the Hawks back into the series

This game was essentially decided in the first quarter, a first quarter the Hawks dominated.

The Hawks scored 38 points on 65% shooting from the field and drained five three-pointers. For reference, the Hawks totalled four three-pointers in Game 2. Atlanta also held the Wizards to 20 points on 30% shooting from the floor and led by as many as 25 points in the opening period.

“They jumped on us in that first period. Their sense of urgency was very high. I wouldn’t say that we came out relaxed. We came out missing shots, but we let that affect our defense. That’s happened before with us during the season, and it’s not pretty.”

— Coach Scott Brooks

Brooks is right. The Hawks’ sense of urgency was high and it had to be. If they had lost this game it would’ve been a done deal. Commentating on Game 3 of the Cavs-Pacers series, TNT’s Kevin McHale had a great line, something along the lines of: “2-1, it’s a series, 3-0, it’s over”.

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The Atlanta Hawks dropped Game 2 of their best-of-7 series against the Washington Wizards 109-101 at Verizon Center. John Wall and Bradley Beal combined for 63 points to lift the Wizards to a 2-0 series lead while the Hawks were led by Paul Millsap’s 27 points and Dennis Schröder’s 23 points in what was a truly ugly affair. And unlike ripping a band-aid off, this horror show took forever and a day to pass…

Per Mike Conti of 92.9 The Game, the Hawks have never recovered from an 0-2 hole in the postseason.

A blown opportunity leaves the Hawks in real trouble

The Hawks held a 94-91 lead with just over 5 minutes remaining in the fourth quarter and, with it, a great chance to emerge from Washington with a split. And then things went horribly wrong. Immediately, John Wall converted a three-point play after being fouled by Paul Millsap — who would commit a travel on the very next play — Bradley Beal then hit a shot, Dennis Schröder air-balled spectacularly, Kent Bazemore committed an offensive foul and then turned the ball over at a crucial point of the game…these were some of the things that happened in the final five minutes, things that helped the Wizards go on a 16-4 run that put the Hawks out of reach.

Atlanta’s best chance to steal a road game in this series came and passed them by, and they were left to rue this missed opportunity due to their poor offense and turnovers down the stretch.

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Deandre Bembry: FROetry

Eric Yeboah —  April 20, 2017

Dr. J, Moochie Norris, Artis Gilmore and Ben Wallace sported some of the freshest Afros in NBA history. Each possessed a fire and flavor like a legendary Gil Scott-Heron track. The Hawks have had their fair share of Afros as well: from 2004–2008 with Josh Childress and briefly from 2013-2014 with Lucas Nogueira donning the natural. Now rookie DeAndre’ Bembry has taken the torch amidst a league predominantly infatuated with temp fades, high top dreads, mohawks and, of course, the all-around caesar cut. Bembry believes that he is helping to keep the throwback relevant, despite the fact that he has not yet played six full months in the NBA.

“Whether it’s the people that have watched me playing at Saint Joseph, playing high school in New Jersey [The Patrick School] or even back home in Charlotte, I’ve been getting a lot of recognition,” Bembry said. “Seeing kids with my jerseys and afros definitely feels like a trend is starting.”

Similar to Elfrid Payton’s weeknd-esque hair, Bembry’s dates back to high school. He started to grow out his hair around his sophomore year, but, after a notably poor AAU game, he decided to cut it all off. Bembry didn’t feel right without the natural on, though, and decided to grow the ‘fro back once again. He hasn’t cut his hair since.

Some grow out the ‘fro for its style, some in order to emulate their heroes, but, in this country, the Afro’s importance goes far beyond the hairs on one’s head. Since the late 1950’s, the Afro has symbolized black beauty and stands as a protest against Eurocentric beauty standards. Now 22 years old, Bembry understands the symbolism behind the fashion choice and, thus, makes sure that he always carries a piece of the fight with him.

“Back in the day people were growing out the ‘fros — black power and the fist is why when I do carry my pick I make sure there is a fist on it,” Bembry said.

Rocking the ‘fro comes with great responsibility, not only because of its important meaning, but because of the incessant day-to-day maintenance it takes. All of those aforementioned, ‘fro-rocking NBA players didn’t just wake up, pick it out and jump on the court — a lot goes into the preparation.

“I use shea moisturizer, you have to keep them type of juices in there and wash your hair at least every other two days,” Bembry said. “It’s unhealthy to wash your hair every day.”

Periodic picking of one’s hair is essential in order to properly groom and shape one’s hair to his or her liking. The pick is meant to be used in the direction in which the afro grows, giving it shape and texture.

“I pick my hair whenever I feel like it, especially when it feels like it’s a little pushed in and not puffy enough,” Bembry said. “That’s why you always keep the pick in your hair and it’s quick. When I wake up, I pick it out. You always need to have a pick with you — always.”

The culmination of these steps results in one of the most iconic African-American hairstyles. Yet, despite all of its glory and symbolic importance, getting made fun of is a part of the package. Bembry has heard it all, but he doesn’t care.

Original, nonconformist: the Bembry way.

“I’ve been called a bunch of stuff, like ‘Jackson 5’ and ‘mushroom head,’” Bembry said. “For me, it’s all about being different. A lot of people try and do what they see others do and I feel like this is something that actually stands out. It’s not in my plans to twist my hair right now. I want to be different and have my own wave.”

Howdy!

Well, Game 1 of the Hawks’ playoff series against the Washington Wizards is in the books and it didn’t exactly go well. So, a brief discussion about the things that went wrong in that game before a brief lookahead to Wednesday’s Game 2

Enjoy Game 2!

The Atlanta Hawks dropped Game 1 of their best-of-7 series against the Washington Wizards, coming out second-best in an ugly 114-107 encounter at Verizon Center. John Wall led the Washington Wizards with a new playoff-high of 32 points and 14 assists while Bradley Beal added 22 points. For the Hawks, they were led by Dennis Schröder’s 25 points.

Turnovers prove costly

From our playoff preview:

Turnovers were a big factor in the regular season-series and whichever team takes care of the ball (and in the process, limits the opposing team’s points off of turnovers) is going to have a huge advantage over the other.

It was indeed a big factor in Game 1 and it was the Wizards who were the ones who took care of the ball while the Hawks were the ones who coughed it up. The Hawks committed 21 total turnovers which led to 23 Washington points. There wasn’t really one specific player who ran up the turnover counter (though Millsap did have four), everyone contributed in that department. The one thing the Wizards love to do is run and get out in transition, and when you fuel them with turnovers they’ll churn out the fast break/turnover points.

Here, Kelly Oubre Jr. gets an arm on a pass from Ersan Ilyasova to Tim Hardaway Jr., and Oubre takes advantage with a dunk in transition.

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