Archives For Jeff Teague

The Las Vegas version of the NBA’s Summer League will start tomorrow. For the second consecutive year, there is a lot to watch for with the young Atlanta Hawks roster.

While rookies Dennis Schröder and Lucas Nogueira stole the show last season, one of the biggest developments was Mike Scott’s expanded shooting.

Scott shot 46% over five games, displaying a refined shooting touch from mid-range, as well as an extension of his game to the 3-point line. Scott only shot 2-for-8 from 3 while in Vegas, but it was more about seeing where Scott wanted to go with improving his game. The improvement translated to the regular season, where Scott attempted 200 3-pointers during the season. Scott only shot 31% on those shots, but the expansion in his game added greater space on offense for himself and the entire team.

Will we see that kind of improvement from a player on this year’s Summer League roster?

Of the players in Vegas for the Hawks, three of them — Mike Muscala, John Jenkins, and Schröder — saw time during the regular season with the team. 2014 draft picks Adreian Payne, Edy Taveres, and Lamar Patterson will also see their first NBA related playing time. Eric Dawson, who played for last year’s Summer League team and was a training camp invite, is on the roster as well. Continue Reading…

Iman Shumpert Available?

Bo Churney —  June 23, 2014 — 4 Comments

Late last night, ESPN’s Marc Stein had this to say about New York Knicks shooting guard Iman Shumpert:



With the Hawks desperately needing a third player that can play defense on the perimeter, this news definitely piqued my interest. Shumpert can effectively play defense on both guard positions, plus he can occasionally guard the 3-position on teams that are small. Shumpert’s offense has been extremely inconsistent over his three NBA seasons, but there is one factor that was in New York that makes me think this can easily be fixed on a team like Atlanta: former Knicks head coach, Mike Woodson. Continue Reading…

2014 Review: Jeff Teague

Bo Churney —  May 30, 2014 — 1 Comment

I have a love/hate relationship with Jeff Teague.

After Dennis Schröder’s performance at Las Vegas Summer League, there were several questions about how long Jeff Teague would be in an Atlanta uniform. Teague’s contract that he just signed — $8 million per year for four years — appeared to be a bit of a bargain, making Jeff a soon-to-be “trade asset” in the minds of many. I was one of those people, thinking that Jeff probably had two more years in Atlanta before the reins would be handed over to Schröder.

Now I’m not so sure about that and my thought process leans more towards Teague being the point guard for the future of this Atlanta franchise.

Early in the season, I was singing high praises of Jeff. Teague looked invigorated and was playing like an All-Star point guard. He was undergoing a bit of a shooting slump at the time, but his play looked well improved from the previous season. Continue Reading…

Two stats that tell the tale of the Hawks’ surprising but short-lived postseason run are defensive and offensive efficiency. In holding the Pacers to 101.6 points per 100 possessions, the Hawks rank 3rd among 16 playoff teams in defensive efficiency. After ranking 14th out of 30 teams during the regular season, this is an unbelievable accomplishment for a team that wasn’t supposed to be competitive against the East’s top seed.

It was on the other end of the floor, however, that the Hawks fell short. After ranking 15th in offensive efficiency during the regular season, the Hawks rank dead last in playoff offensive efficiency, managing only 98.2 points per 100 possessions. Through the first five games of the series, the Pacers were worse defensively than the Hawks. Atlanta’s offensive woes were party a function of being unable to knock down open shots, and party a function of the fact that, since Game 6, the Pacers have resumed their role as the best defensive team in the league.

The biggest killer for the Hawks was the fact that Pero Antic shot 17% from the field for the series and 12% from 3-point range. If Antic, whom I noted had the best plus-minus of any Hawk against the Pacers during the regular season, shot even 25% from three in this series, I believe the Hawks would still be playing. Antic helped the Hawks win Game 1 by scoring eight points, including 2-for-5 shooting from 3-point range. The Pacers would mostly leave Antic wide open as he shot 1-for-20 from distance over the final six games. The Pacers’ ability to play off Antic allowed the team to keep a big man in the lane, thus reducing the effectiveness of Jeff Teague off the dribble. Continue Reading…

FINAL
Pacers win series, 4-3

IND(4-3) 95 – 80 (3-4) ATL

Key Performers:
P. George (IND): 30 pts, 11 reb, 3 ast, 2 stl
P. Millsap (ATL): 15 pts, 17 reb, 4 ast, 4 stl
[FULL BOX SCORE]

So that’s that.

The Hawks were eliminated from the playoffs on Saturday after a lid seemed to form over their basket in Indiana. The Pacer defense was good, but the Hawks continued to get open look after open look. Unfortunately for the Hawks and their fans, those shots just would not fall.

The Hawks and Pacers were essentially even through the first quarter, but the second quarter is what set this game apart. Paul George got hot, scoring 10 points in the quarter, and the Hawks became icy cold, shooting 4-for-20 from the field in the period, including a 1-for-15 stretch to close out the half. The second half was like the first quarter: essentially a tie. However, the disastrous second quarter cost the Hawks the game and effectively ended their season.

Reaction Grades: [assessed 0-10]

Jeff Teague: This wasn’t exactly a banner game from Jeff: 5-for-16 shooting, five turnovers, and five fouls. Like all of the Hawks, he just couldn’t get his shot to fall, and that affected Jeff more than any other Hawk, as the defense is able to close down and focus more on Teague when the shots aren’t falling. 5/10

Paul Millsap: Millsap was 6-for-21 from the field, but he did maintain his other strengths by continuously getting rebounds and jumping passing lanes. Just one note I want to take away from this game: after the way this series went, I find it odd that Millsap couldn’t get a foul call to save his life here. Not a conspiracy theory or anything, just officiating needs to be more consistent across games. 7/10

Kyle Korver: Korver was one of the only Hawks that was actually able to find the bottom of the net during the game. He finished with 19 points on 6-for-13 shooting, the best shooting by percentage of any Hawk during the game. 6.5/10

DeMarre Carroll: It wasn’t DeMarre’s game, either. Paul George was hitting some extremely tough looks over DeMarre, a matchup disadvantage that was further compounded by DeMarre going 1-for-7 from the field. 5/10

Pero Antic: Pero was 0-for-5 from the floor… yet he posted the highest plus-minus of any Hawks with a plus-2 rating. Plus-minus isn’t everything, but it does seem to be an accurate reflection of Pero’s defensive abilities when compared to Mike Scott. 5/10 Continue Reading…

FINAL
Series tied, 3-3

IND(3-3) 88 – 95 (3-3) ATL

Key Performers:
D. West (IND): 24 pts, 11 reb, 6 ast, 2 stl
P. Millsap (ATL): 16 pts, 18 reb, 5 ast, 3 stl, 2 blk
[FULL BOX SCORE]

Well it’s not like the Hawks lost in the most heartbreaking way imaginable, right? Oh wait…

For the second time in the series, the Hawks blew a late fourth quarter lead which a chance to either take a strangle-hold on the series, or in this game, to completely ice it altogether. Instead, we have the Hawks giving up what was once a double-digit lead, and then to make matters worse, they fouled with 33 seconds left after throwing the ball away while down only two points. (both mistakes courtesy of Lou Williams) Overall, it was just another postseason spectacle that people have become accustomed to seeing from Atlanta sports.

Reaction Grades: [assessed 0-10]

Jeff Teague: Teague may have missed a couple of opportunities last in the game, but it shouldn’t take away from his awesome offensive performance that he had. He scored 29 points — 18 in the second half — and was truly entertaining to watch as he dribbled, drove, and spun his way into the teeth of the Indiana defense. He also only had one turnover in 40 minutes of play. 9/10

Paul Millsap: He wasn’t exactly efficient from the field with his 4-for-13 shooting, but he was usually the steady force on both ends of the floor throughout the entire game. I’m going to repeat his stat line from the key performer listing because it’s worth repeating: 16 points, 18 rebounds, five assists, three steals, and two blocks. He might not have always been successful with his shooting, but he gave his maximum effort in this game. 9/10

Kyle Korver: Wasn’t exactly a banner night for Korver. First off, he couldn’t really hit anything. Then, he got into foul trouble, which makes things worse because even if Kyle can’t hit his open shots, the attention he draws from the defense is always worth the spacing. And of course, he got a technical because Joey Crawford and Bennett Salvatore were officiating this game. 6/10

DeMarre Carroll: It was one of DeMarre’s better defensive performances of the series, as he forced Paul George into 7-for-18 shooting. George was able to get to the FT line 10 times, but none of those attempts were due to a foul on DeMarre. 7.5/10

Pero Antic: Here’s where I’m conflicted: Pero played awful offensive basketball. He was 1-for-7 from the field with three turnovers… yet the Hawks were plus-11 when he was on the floor. The Pacers are still guarding him even though he isn’t hitting his shots, so I really don’t know what to make of his contributions. At least he’s good defensively. 5/10 Continue Reading…

Can we all take a moment to sit back and admire the unbelievable job the Atlanta Hawks have done in dismantling the best defense in the NBA? For the regular season, the Pacers allowed 96.7 points per 100 possessions, the best defensive efficiency rating in the league. The Hawks were mid-pack, allowing 104.1 per 100 to rank 14th. In these playoffs, the Pacers are ranked 6th out of 16 playoff teams, allowing 101.9 points per 100 possessions, more than five points more per 100 than the team allowed in the regular season.

Incredibly, the Hawks presently rank 5th in playoff defensive efficiency, allowing 101.5 points per 100, a decrease of almost three points. That is… stupefying? Dumbfounding? I’m struggling for words to convey how stupendous the Hawks have been on both ends of the floor in this series. Can I buy a vowel?

Let’s take a look at some individual performers who have stepped up for the Hawks and contributed to the stellar collective effort. Go get some coffee and come back, this could take a while. First of all, when did Paul Millsap change his name to Godzilla and decide to take a stroll through Indianapolis? He’s averaging 21 points and 8.2 rebounds per game on 45/44/81 shooting from the floor/3-point line/free throw line. Although he is playing three more minutes per game (still four fewer than the overworked Paul George), he has increased his scoring average vs. the regular season by three points. He has maintained his average of two blocks per game but it seems like he’s altering more shots than that. Are there any questions from the floor about Millsap deserving his All-Star nod this season? Continue Reading…

When a team loses a single-possession game, there are normally several plays that could have changed the outcome. In the first half of Game 4, one play that stood out was a Roy Hibbert layup with 5:09 remaining to put the Pacers ahead 37-35. Hibbert was initially tied up by Paul Millsap. The ref must either call a travel or a jump ball in that situation. This isn’t Vietnam, there are rules. Millsap had no chance to contest the second shot, so the referees essentially awarded the Pacers two points on this possession.

The other play that stood out in the first half was a bad decision by Jeff Teague. On Twitter before and during the game, I really hyped Teague’s opportunity to take a further step into the national spotlight by leading his team to a win that would place his team on the cusp of an historic series upset. After Mike Scott’s three to put the Hawks up 46-37 with two minutes to play in the half, Teague appeared ready to take over.

Teague blew by Paul George’s weak steal attempt for a layup and 48-38 Hawks lead with 1:21 to play in the half. I always emphasize closing out quarters, halves and games by nursing or extending a lead, or whittling away at a deficit if a team is trailing. When a team is up 10 just before halftime, clock management becomes critical to maintaining that lead. Continue Reading…

FINAL
Series tied, 2-2

IND(2-2) 91 – 88 (2-2) ATL

Key Performers:
P. Millsap (ATL): 29 pts, 7 reb, 3 blk
P. George (IND): 24 Pts, 10 Reb, 5 Ast, 2 Blk
[FULL BOX SCORE]

A win today would have been gigantic for the Hawks. Going up 3-1, winning both games at home, and sending Indiana back home in an even bigger mental mess than they’re already in would have given Atlanta a lot of momentum going into Game 5. However, that wasn’t the case.

The Pacers they played a lot more like themselves. The body language issues that appeared to be plaguing them the entire series were for the most part non existent. The defense returned to form, minus a poor performance in the 2nd quarter, and of course, since they were playing an Atlanta sports team, something that made no sense had to happen. That something was a David West clutch three pointer. Then just as the Hawks thought they had hope with a chance to tie the game at the end, they couldn’t convert. The Pacers missed free throws to ice the game, giving the Hawks one last shot. The Pacers played excellent defense, blew up any semblance of a play, and left the Hawks with a Pero Antic contested 3 that didn’t go in.

Despite the Hawks loss, this series is far from over. The Hawks showed in Game 1 they can win in Indiana. Game 5 is a huge game however. With today’s win, the Pacers have won 3 games in Atlanta since 2006. Winning game 5 would give the Hawks an advantage and put history on their side. Should they lose however, they have to win two straight games. Something they haven’t shown the ability to do.

Reaction Grades: [assessed 0-10]

Jeff Teague: While Teague never had any consistency scoring, shooting 5-for-15 for 14 points, he more than made up for it in the rest of his game. 7 assists, 6 rebounds and a solid defensive effort. However, he did have 4 turnovers. Not his best game in the world but very far from bad as there were moments he looked completely unstoppable. 7/10

Paul Millsap: Millsap was a monster. 10-for-18 from the field for 29 points, 7 rebounds, and he even swatted himself 3 blocks. Millsap again stretched the floor for the Hawks in a big way hitting three of his six three point attempts. When Millsap wasn’t stretching the floor he was dominating everywhere else. Post ups, face ups, spot ups, pull ups, isolations it didn’t matter. Millsap was scoring. On defense he made Roy Hibbert, Ian Mahinimi, and David West’s lives a living hell constantly harassing them. Millsap was the main reason the Hawks had a chance to win at the end. 10/10

Kyle Korver: Good news and bad news. Good news, Korver was able to let it loose from long range and find shots that he wanted to take. Bad news, while Korver let it fly from deep with eight attempts, he only managed to make three of them. He did however play some decent defense and pull down 9 rebounds. 7/10

DeMarre Carroll: Carroll on offense was not pretty. Was almost a non factor. On defense he shined. It would be easy to look at Paul George’s stat line and blame Carroll for that but he contested a lot of shots. Also got to give Carroll some iron man props. He played 40 minutes, more than any other player besides Paul George. Still, it’s very difficult to look past how ineffective Carroll was on offense. 6/10

Pero Antic: I’m not sure if the Pacers are starting to figure Antic out but he had a dreadful game. Defense was alright but other than he contributed nothing. 1/10 Continue Reading…